Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy

Hysteroscopy

A hysteroscopy is a common procedure, usually carried out on an outpatient basis. It is used to examine the inside of the uterus and is carried out using a hysteroscope (a narrow tube with a telescope at the end). Images are sent to a computer to give a close-up of the womb. Depending on the reason for your hysteroscopy, it can be performed under local or general anaesthetic.

Make An Appointment

Set out below are the contact details for our main Service Departments. The teams in these areas have a dedicated and caring approach to find you the earliest appointment possible with the correct specialist for your needs.

Most patients are referred to us by their GP or another medical specialist as a referral letter is often needed before an appointment can be confirmed.

If you do not have a GP, then we may be able to assist you by suggesting the most appropriate course of action for you to take, given your location and individual circumstance.

If you have medical insurance (e.g. Bupa, Axa PPP, Norwich Union), you will need to contact your insurer to get authorisation for any treatment and, in most cases, you will require a referral letter from your GP.

Make an Appointment

Hysteroscopy

A hysteroscopy is a common procedure, usually carried out on an outpatient basis. It is used to examine the inside of the uterus and is carried out using a hysteroscope (a narrow tube with a telescope at the end). Images are sent to a computer to give a close-up of the womb. Depending on the reason for your hysteroscopy, it can be performed under local or general anaesthetic.

A hysteroscopy can be used to help diagnosis cases where a woman’s symptoms suggest that there may be a problem with the womb. Symptoms such as –

  • pelvic pain
  • heavy or irregular periods
  • bleeding in between normal periods
  • unusual vaginal discharge
  • repeated miscarriage
  • infertility

A hysteroscopy can also be used to remove abnormal growths from the womb, such as –

  • polyps – small growths that develop on the lining of the womb and can cause irregular and heavy periods
  • fibroids – non-cancerous growths that can develop inside the womb and can sometimes cause symptoms such as pain and heavy periods
  • intrauterine adhesions – which are sections of scar tissue that can cause absent periods and infertility

The surgeon will use a device called a speculum to open up the walls of the vagina, in the same way it is used during a smear test. The surgeon will then insert the hysteroscope through the cervix, into the womb. Often gas or fluid is used to inflate the womb to give the surgeon a better view. If a biopsy or treatment, such as removal of polyps, is needed, other instruments will be passed into the womb. A hysteroscopy usually takes between 10 and 30 minutes, depending on what needs to be done.

Some women will experience cramping similar to period pains after a hysteroscopy, but this usually passes within a few days. Most women feel they can return to normal activities, such as work, the day after the procedure. A hysteroscopy is a very safe procedure with a low risk of complications.

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